Next week, join contract faculty for a social media day of action

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Will you join us next Wednesday, February 12 as part of our annual Social Media Day of Action?

It’s a day for contract faculty and allies to come together to support publicly funded education and better contract faculty working conditions.

The Ford government is full of #BrokenPromises – to workers, to students, to communities.

Half of the faculty in Ontario universities work on short-term precarious contracts, often without benefits or any job security. University funding cuts don’t just mean lay-offs, they jeopardize the futures of contract faculty and their families.

The Ford government has broken its promise to not cut jobs in the public sector, including at Ontario’s universities. They have broken promises to make life affordable by making massive cuts to OSAP. They have even broken their cynical promise to “reduce red tape” by burdening Ontario’s postsecondary institutions with even more bureaucracy, including a reckless and complex new funding model and unnecessary free speech policies.

Together, we will continue the fight to push back against the Ford government, working with the public school teachers, support workers, and parents who are tired of Ford’s #BrokenPromises and cuts to our cherished public education system.

Next Wednesday, join us on Twitter and use the hashtag #BrokenPromises to tweet your stories of how the Ford government cuts are hurting public education.

3 Responses to “Next week, join contract faculty for a social media day of action”

  1. Hugh Scoggan

    Thankyou, Andrea Calver and OCUFA folks, for supporting these university instructors in precarious job positions at universities in Ontario. They are the hope of the future for my grandchildren for whom education is important toward moving themselves and, hopefully, this precarious and precious world (aka Gaia) up Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. I had the privilege of receiving an excellent education in Ontario, pre-Mike Harris, bless his heart, from kindergarten through university, which enabled me to give back as a lab instructor in 3 Schools of Anatomy for 40 consecutive years. Doug Ford and his education ministers, the day after they came to power, immediately damaged education and learning in Ontario by halving the library budgets of all public libraries, exemplified by cutbacks for interlibrary loans.

    Keep up the good fight for my grandchildren, please!

    Hugh Scoggan, privileged and grateful graduate of Lady Evelyn Public School, Hopewell Avenue Public School, Glebe Collegiate Institute, Qualifying Year at Carleton University, and Queen’s University (BA, MSc), all government-funded in Ontario.

    Retired former lab instructor in 3 Schools of Anatomy in Ontario, 2 of them publicly funded (Queen’s University and University of Waterloo)

    Reply
  2. Henry Lowi

    My classes at Humber College are 50% bigger than 2 years ago. How can this serve education? Ford claims to care for the students, but I don’t believe him. Over-size classes mean less we’ll-trained, less well-educated, less employable students and graduates. We want well-informed students well -equipped to take control of their futures. Say no to cutbacks! Say yes to a common front of, and joint action by, all education workers.

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  3. Doug Roberts

    As a library staff member at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, I completely support our contract faculty and all faculty working to improve public education. We must all be working together in solidarity to reverse cuts to education and other essential public services.

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